Barnsley Civic Trust in 2021

Twelve months ago, in March 2020, just before the first lockdown, Barnsley Civic Trust held a well-attended event on The Hidden Art of Barnsley, one of a programme of events in 2019 and the beginning of 2020.

Since that time BCT has not been able to operate; there have been no meetings although posts have continued on Facebook and Twitter, and the website has been revamped

As we near a return to a new normality, it is clear that Barnsley has suffered tremendously and there has never been such a need for people to actively care about the recovery of the centre – its shops, leisure facilities, businesses, public spaces, heritage and the environment.

Barnsley Civic Trust aims to make this its priority by undertaking activities to do what it can to bring the town back to being a lively, prosperous and attractive place for the whole community.

Barnsley Civic Trust is a small group but one which can exert influence to engender a pride in our town and is a primary voice on civic issues. To do this it needs the support of its membership and supporters.

If you are a recent member please reply to the email you have been sent asking you to confirm your intention to continue supporting Barnsley Civic Trust

If you might be interested in supporting Barnsley Civic Trust and perhaps becoming a member, please get in touch for further information.

The position due to Covid-19

Barnsley Civic Trust has suspended its schedule of committee and other meetings as a result of the escalation in the Covid-19 virus situation and the strengthened advice from central government.

We will stay in touch online and continue to comment on local issues and developments and plan for future activities.

Helping and supporting each other at this difficult time is really important. We look forward to the time when the emergency has passed.

Information will be made available on our website and via social media, as well as by email to our members.

Barnsley Civic Trust annual general meeting

A short annual general meeting will take place at 7pm on Tuesday 11 June 2019. It will last about half an hour. Nominations are welcome to join the executive committee – please contact the secretary for a form. Refreshments will be available from 6.30pm. 

The main part of the evening will be an illustrated talk by Stuart Currie of the Tasker Trust on the historic streets of the town, the significant buildings sadly lost in the changes which have taken place over  the last 100 years and the buildings which we really should ensure do not disappear in the future. An important role for Barnsley Civic Trust. 

Masonic Hall, Cockerham Lane off Huddersfield Road (just north of Barnsley Town Centre)

James Hudson Taylor talk

Great talk on Tuesday 26 February by Fred Thompson and Philip Nuthall on the James Hudson Taylor trail in Barnsley and on Salem Church. We discusssed raising awareness of James Hudson Taylor and attracting more people to Barnsley to visit Salem Church and follow the trail.

Good to know that the two Barnsley Civic Trust blue plaques started the trail in 2012; now augmented by the red plaques of the trail

Talk on getting good design in our town

Tom Lonsdale gave an interesting and informative talk on Design in Regeneration and the work of the  Barnsley Design Panel; members of Barnsley Civic Trust were joined by others interested in the topic at a recent meeting.  Tom, the chair of the Design Panel, covered a wide range of aspects of design and some of the major schemes in the town centre.

This talk is one of a series of talks promoted by Barnsley Civic Trust

 

Comments on bridge replacing jumble lane railway crossing

A decision on the planning application for the new ‘iconic’ foot bridge to replace the town centre railway crossing was made on Wednesday 24 October.

 

Jumble Lane crossing is due to be closed by Network Rail in March 2019 with a temporary bridge in place.

At a recent meeting of Barnsley Civic Trust, Sarah McHale from Barnsley Council told us that the new permanent bridge is designed by Renato Benedetti (Benadetti Architects) who also designed the new bridge in Castleford. The structure cost is estimated at £5m with £2m from Network Rail and £3m from BMBC.

The bridge will be ‘stunningly’ lit at night and the bridge deck is a 1.8 meter deep steel channel wide enough to cope with large flows on match days.

It has to be high enough for electrification and wide enough for platform extension in case these are planned in the future.

The main points raised at the Barnsley Civic Trust meeting were the nature of the deck and not being able to see out of it, the nature of fencing to the railway (Network Rail insisting on palisade), and the look of the canopy to the ‘funicular’ lift at either side of the bridge for people with disabilities and pushchairs etc.

The meeting, however, liked the bridge and thought that it has come a long way from its first incarnation.

Barnsley Civic Trust conveyed these views to the council and in addition we commented that it appears from the positioning of the ‘funicular lift’ on the opposite sides of the bridge at both ends that people in wheel chairs and cyclist will have to cross from one side of the bridge to the other, cutting across the route that everyone else will take. This can’t be right, can it?